BratBurgers

bratburger

These burgers have become one of my family’s most popular summertime grill requests- they’re juicy, tasty, and a great calorie bargain.   If you like sauerkraut, that’d be great on these burgers, or you could do some sauteed onions and peppers- but I just like plain old yellow mustard on mine!

 

 

burger press
As always, this is not an affiliate link and I’m not receiving any financial compensation, but if you want one of these for your very own, you can click here and buy one.

Now the instructions below are really straightforward on this recipe, but I do have one little secret to share that will help make these a breeze to put together- it’s my burger maker gizmo.  Very high tech as you can see!  It cost me less than $5, and works like a charm!

 

 

 

burgerpress
Here’s the underside- see, nothing underneath where you put the meat and then have to get it back out without messing up the patty! No muss, no fuss!

I like this one because there is nothing on the bottom from where I have to dig the burger out of- I just place my ball of meat on a cutting mat, cover it with a plastic baggie, (the bread, twisty tie kind- it’s thinner so it allows better formation of the patty) cover the meat ball with my burger press,

 

 

then hold the bottom part in place, while pushing down gently on the plunger thing up top until there’s resistance.  Take the press off, and, VOILA!  Perfectly shaped patties every time!  If I do it just right, the press doesn’t even get dirty- now what girl wouldn’t be a fan of that?!

 

 

vacuum sealer
This is my vacuum sealer- best $150 I’ve ever spent, in terms of keeping meat in an organized way that prevents freezer burn so it goes to waste.

One final tip for this post- I make these burgers in batches of about a dozen or so, or 3 to 4 pounds of meat, at a time. Bob grills them all at once, and when they’re cool I vacuum seal each one individually so I’ll have a quick and easy meal any time I need one.

 

 

 

 

sealed meat
I write the weight, and date sealed on each item so I’ll know how many it will serve (3 to 5 oz. of meat per person) and how long it’s been in the frozen tundra.

No, your eyes are not broken- these are not burgers, just a bunch of meat I’ve sealed just like I do my burgers, in individual packages, so they’ll be quick to thaw and cook when I’m in a pinch.

 

 

 

 

Oh, and here’s a link for the spice blend I use- we have a Penzeys Spice Shop close by, but if you don’t you can order- and they’ll send you a catalog of their stuff, which is jammed full of recipes!  Click here to find “Bratwurst Sausage Seasoning.”

 

BratBurgers
Print Recipe
Servings
12
Servings
12
BratBurgers
Print Recipe
Servings
12
Servings
12
Ingredients
Servings:
Instructions
  1. Place the applesauce in a fine mesh strainer and allow it to drain while preparing the rest of the ingredients.
  2. Peel and dice the onion, then saute until golden brown.
  3. Place the ground turkey, strained applesauce , sauteed onion, and seasoning in a large bowl. Using a potato masher, mix the ingredients well.
  4. Divide the mixture into 4 to 5 oz portions, and form into patties. See pics and instructions above for using my burger press.
  5. Grill or pan fry patties until thoroughly cooked; the internal temperature must reach 165F to ensure all bacteria is killed.
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Apple Rice & Pork Roast Dinner

 

dinner
You can serve the pork sliced, on the side, or do what I did here, and make it into a casserole.

 

A few nights ago, I sent Bob to the store to get a rotisserie chicken- it was Weight Watchers night, and I knew I’d be starving for dinner but wouldn’t want to cook. Bless his heart, when we got home, he’d gotten a chicken, cut it all up, set the table, AND he brought me a rotisseried (I know, that’s not a real word, but it should be) pork roast for the next night!  There are many reasons I married the man, and this kind of thing is just one of them.  : ]

So the next night, I pulled out that pork roast and realized I had absolutely nothing to go with it.  Golly gee whiz, I thought to myself, guess I’ll just have to make something up, and call it an experiment.  Novel idea.  I can hear my kids’ eyes rolling round and round, ha ha!

So, I threw lots of things I know Bob loves together, and based on his reaction, it was magical!  He went back for fourths– now, you can’t beat that for a ringing endorsement!

onions
See- very thin slices! This speeds up the caramelization process. And, you need lots of onion as it shrinks down dramatically as it caramelizes. Think of it as a reduction- as the onions lose their water, and the sugar becomes concentrated, the volume decreases, but the flavor explodes.

Here’s how to do it:  To begin with, clean and peel a very large onion, then slice it very thinly.  Plate it, along with the olive oil, baking soda, and salt in a large non-stick skillet.  Over medium high heat, allow the onions to sweat, or release their moisture, then lower to heat to medium and allow them to continue to cook and brown, stirring occasionally.

 

 

If you want more detailed instruction on caramelizing onions, here is a link for a Food Network tutorial.

 

apple peeler
I’ve had several different brands- these things range in cost from about $11 to $50. The pic here is one I found at Wal-Mart, on clearance, for $11!  None of mine have lasted more than a year or two, so I just count on having to get a new one every so often. This one is my back up- I’ll never be without that again, as getting in the middle of doing 10 to 20 pounds of apples from the farmers’ market, and having one break, is not fun.

While the onions cook, peel, core, and slice the apples.  I use a fancy shamancy peeler, slicer, corer gadget to do this, like this one. Some have suction cups to hold them in place while you crank the handle; others have to be clamped onto the counter top. I like the suction cup myself, but whatever kind, this thing will change your life when it comes to cooking with apples!

 

With one of these handy dandy gizmos, I can prep enough apples for a humongous pie or cobbler in a matter of minutes– needless to say, since apple-anything is Bob’s favorite, he thinks they’re worth the investment.

Once you’ve gotten all of the apples prepped, spray a casserole with non-stick cooking spray, then add them, along with everything else, give it a stir, and cover it.  Microwave on high for 15 to 20 minutes, or until all of the moisture has been absorbed.

casserole

You can serve pork slices on the side, or do what I did and make a casserole out of the whole thing.  It’s not quite as sophisticated looking, but what can I say- I like a little bite of everything in every bite!

 

 

Apple Rice & Pork Roast
Print Recipe
Servings
6
Servings
6
Apple Rice & Pork Roast
Print Recipe
Servings
6
Servings
6
Ingredients
Servings:
Instructions
  1. Clean and peel the onion, slice very thinly, and caramelize in a large non-stick skillet, along with the oil, salt, and baking soda.
  2. Peel, core, and slice the apples.
  3. Spray a casserole with non-stick cooking spray, then add all ingredients and stir to combine well.
  4. Microwave for 15 to 20 minutes, or until liquid is all absorbed.
  5. Serve with slices of lean pork roast, or dice the meat and stir in to make a casserole.
Recipe Notes

As far as calories* go, the entire rice mixture- not including the meat- contains right around 850 calories.  So, each of four portions will have roughly 215, or each of six portions will have about 140.  Lean meats generally have between 30 and 45 calories per ounce.  So you can figure out how much of the rice and how many ounces of meat your calorie budget allows for.  1/6 of the rice + 4 ounces of a pork tenderloin roast will run you about 270 calories; 1/4 of the rice + 4 ounces of that pork will run you around 340 calories.  To figure this kind of information on your own, go here, where nutritional information is offered for just about any food you can think of.

*To see my policy on nutritional information, go here and scroll down.

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